Millennials, Uncategorized, Work

What Millennials Really Want at Work: 3 Tips for Keeping and Engaging Millennials

August 18, 2016

You’ve got to love millennials, right? I love how this video represents some of the funny stereotypes that can be associated with this generation. It’s true, millennials are often considered self-absorbed, lazy, distracted, and entitled. But they are also capturing the attention of employers and researchers everywhere as they are on the way to becoming the majority of the work force.

According to a recent Gallup report, 71% of millennials are either not engaged or are actively disengaged at work. This lack of engagement by the millennial group (those born between 1980 and 1996) can lead to disloyalty to the organizations they serve. Why is this something we should care about? Because millenials make up about 38% of the workforce in America, and by 2025 that will jump to nearly 75% of the workforce. Employee turnover comes at a high price, so it could be worth your time to strategize ways to engage the millennial workforce, and harness their strengths.

Here are a few suggestions for engaging this powerful group of contributors:

1. Be a mentor. While it can seem that many millenials are entitled or overly-confident, we still value mentorship. Millennials want guidance from their counterparts who are older, and more experienced in the workforce. We are a very relational group, and often enjoy hearing feedback from an authentic relationship. Take time to provide helpful coaching conversations, and millennials will become more engaged in their work.

2. Communicate the company’s vision, and how millenials play a part. Millennials may seem short-sighted at times, but we do think about long-term plans. Millennials have a desire to make a positive impact on the organization they serve. We have grown up in a world where we see everyone’s successes and goals on social media, and can be tempted to lose patience with what we think should have been accomplished in our lives by now. This results in only half of millennials expecting to be with their current company one year from now. To help shift this staggering statistic, managers should show that they care about a millennial’s long-term plans. By communicating long-term vision which incorporates millennial’s role, this group will be more likely to get on board and stick around to join in making that vision a reality.

3. Recognize the myth that millennials are different from the preceding generations. Millennials want purpose, feedback and work/life balance just like those in the Gen X and Baby Boomer generations. Yes, millennials are more likely to voluntarily leave their jobs than their older counterparts, but the same was true two decades ago for employees under the age of 35. I would argue that millennials are not particularly unique when compared to other generations. Millennials are just young. As was every generation at some point. Treat millennials how any employee would want to be treated, and this will help foster long-term commitment.

When given guidance and purpose, millennials can be a powerful asset to any company. As companies look to the future, those that incorporate millennials well will be on the right track for success.

-LM

Related Articles:

Gallup- Many Millennials are Job Hoppers- But Not All

Harvard Business Review- What Do Millennials Really Want At Work? The Same Things The Rest of us Do

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